The Andyson Platinum R 1200W PSU - External Appearance

Visually, the Andyson Platinum R 1200W is not exactly a work of art yet it does have an element of subtleness and can be fairly appealing, depending on your requirements. The long chassis is sprayed with a grainy matte black paint, a circular finger guard covers the cooling fan and a subtle sticker with the company logo has been placed on its side.

 

A decorative sticker covers the right side of the chassis, facing towards the windowed side panel if the PSU is installed with the fan facing upwards. If the PSU is installed with the fan facing downwards, the sticker will be facing the right panel of the case and it will be upside down. 

The left side of the PSU is almost entirely plain, with the exception of a series logo printed at the lower right corner of the chassis. This logo will be upside down if the PSU is installed with the fan facing downwards.

 

The rear of the PSU is a little interesting, with the AC cable receptacle and the on/off switch placed on a different, white metallic frame that covers nearly half of the surface. The other half is perforated for the cooling air to escape to the exterior of the case.

A large number of connectors for the modular cables take up most of the space at the front of the unit. The rest of the surface is covered by a sticker, serving as a legend for the connectors and as a warning label. Funnily, it advises against the removal of the PSU cover and warns that the warranty will be void if the seal is broken, yet this cover cannot be removed and there is no warranty sticker to be found anywhere.

The sticker with the electrical specification of the PSU can be found at the top of the chassis.

 

Introduction, Packaging & Bundle The Andyson Platinum R 1200W PSU - Internal Design
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  • jabber - Friday, April 24, 2015 - link

    Excellent...another PSU...I would never need to buy. Once again can we have some 'sane' PSU reviews? Reply
  • CrazyElf - Friday, April 24, 2015 - link

    The reason why I don't consider the sub-1000 watt as big is because the larger watt PSUs seem to cost exponentially more money than the ones that are cheaper in terms of price:watt output.

    That being said, never skimp and buy cheap PSUs.
    Reply
  • Margalus - Friday, April 24, 2015 - link

    It's not about "cheap", it's about the output. Probably less than 1% of power users would need something this big. My system is an overclocked i7 930, 12GB of ram, 2-1TB hd's, 3 ssd's, a gtx970 SC, lg blu ray burner. It has never drawn more than 350W from the outlet. under normal circumstances it's about 150W for web browsing, or just general work. Goes up to 250W with most games. So I agree with jabber, it's not a "sane" psu for the vast majority of users. Reply
  • jabber - Friday, April 24, 2015 - link

    Indeed, some of us aren't in our teens/20's any more and want quality, reliability and VFM, not just moar power! Plus a lot of us are moving to 'smaller boxes'. The term 'PC enthusiast' these days doesn't just mean flames/dragons on the case and lot of LEDs. It's not the turn of the century anymore. Reply
  • nathanddrews - Friday, April 24, 2015 - link

    Right, some of us are beyond our 20s and have more disposable income and like to build more robust overclocked, quad CF/SLI systems that require bigger/better PSUs. This review is helpful to those people.

    Fortunately, the "majority of users" don't matter in enthusiast-level reviews. Titan X, 295X2, 5960X, etc. "Most people" don't need more than a random, budget 500W PSU. Those PSUs are a dime a dozen.

    1. Go to Amazon/Newegg.
    2. Sort by highest rating.
    3. Purchase the first one under $60.
    Reply
  • Margalus - Friday, April 24, 2015 - link

    nobody is saying to stop these reviews of extreme psu's , just add some that the majority of the enthusiasts can make practical use of. The last several psu reviews on this site have been for extreme psu's like this, they are ignoring a huge segment of the market. The last several reviews have been for a 1200W unit, 2000W unit, 1050W unit, 1500W unit. Reply
  • jabber - Saturday, April 25, 2015 - link

    Some people really don't have a clue what 'enthusiast' means. It doesn't necessarily mean build the biggest and most expensive. Some of us have more subtle tastes. Reply
  • cruzinforit - Saturday, April 25, 2015 - link

    You are an idiot, please do not give people purchasing advice on computer hardware ever again. Not all sub 1kw psus are created equal, and in fact Andyson has made some sub Par ones themselves lately.

    See here
    http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReview...
    Reply
  • JonnyDough - Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - link

    That was awfully snide. Work on manners? Reply
  • Dansolo - Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - link

    Grow up. Most of us realize that every single game is playable with high settings without ever touching SLI/CF and that using SLI/CF just adds a ton of problems. It's actually mainly the younger people who want these useless things while the rest of us aren't living with our parents anymore and have a mortgage and other hobbies like cars.

    It is absolutely a valid comment to point out that AAT's reviews have been very out-of-touch with the community. Personally I rarely read an AAT review these days for this exact reason. The only reason I even clicked this review is because I was curious if Andyson makes decent PSUs at all.
    Reply

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